Major Swedish engagement in the UN Ocean Conference

On 11 January, Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lövin hosted Swedish stakeholders with an interest in oceans at an information meeting about the UN Ocean Conference, due to be held in New York on 5–9 June. There were over one hundred representatives of companies, the knowledge society, civil society and government agencies present – all with the joint agenda of working to save our oceans.

  • Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lövin at the information meeting on the UN Ocean Conference.

    Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lövin at the information meeting on the UN Ocean Conference.

    Photo: Elin Nyström/Government Offices

  • Johan Kuylenstierna, Executive Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute, was moderator at the information meeting on the UN Ocean Conference.

    Johan Kuylenstierna, Executive Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute, was moderator at the information meeting on the UN Ocean Conference.

    Photo: Elin Nyström/Government Offices

  • Mattias Rust, Acting Head of the Water and Ocean Unit at the WWF, stressed the major economic potential to be protected in our marine environment.

    Mattias Rust, Acting Head of the Water and Ocean Unit at the WWF, stressed the major economic potential to be protected in our marine environment.

    Photo: Elin Nyström/Government Offices

  • Goal 14: Oceans, seas and marine resources.

    Goal 14: Oceans, seas and marine resources.

    Graphics: UN

Sustainable oceans essential for global development

The 2030 Agenda is a global agenda for sustainable development, in which Goal 14 on sustainable oceans plays a key role. Ms Lövin emphasised that the marine environment is fundamental to poverty reduction, food security and economic development for hundreds of millions of people. At the same time, there is a strong negative trend.

"If we do not break the current trend, in 2050 there will be as much plastic in the oceans as there are fish. Measures have to be taken quickly and resolutely. This is why Sweden and Fiji have taken the initiative to host the UN's first major ocean conference," said Ms Lövin.

Goal 14 covers a broad range of marine issues, such as sustainable fishing, marine littering, ocean acidification and a sustainable blue economy. This was also clearly reflected in the broad participation in the meeting, moderated by Johan Kuylenstierna, Executive Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute.

The Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management and other Swedish government agencies presented their roles in Sweden's work on Goal 14 and the conference, as did the World Maritime University in Malmö, which is the only UN body located in Sweden. The strong academic presence highlighted how far Swedish-led research has come in the marine environment area, as well as the importance of linking this research to a broader development perspective.

Partnerships and cooperation are a success factor

The Ocean Conference will build long-term, innovative and concrete partnerships between states, civil society, the private sector, the knowledge society and other stakeholders. This is why broad participation from all areas of society is important, at local, regional, national and global level.

"The oceans are our world bank. There is major economic potential to be protected in our marine environment," said Mattias Rust from the WWF.

Swedish companies represented at the meeting also highlighted how innovative solutions are contributing to sustainable marine management.

Register for the Ocean Conference by 22 January 2017

Contact

Annika Flensburg
Press Secretary to Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister
Phone (switchboard) +46 8 405 10 00