Archive: Term of service 06 October 2006–04 October 2010

The Government introduces green car rebate

The Government is introducing a rebate of SEK 10 000 to private individuals who buy a new green car. The rebate scheme will be in effect from 1 April 2007 until 31 December 2009.

The Government is introducing a rebate of SEK 10 000 to private individuals who buy a new green car. The rebate scheme will be in effect from 1 April 2007 until 31 December 2009.


The Swedish Road Administration will be responsible for administering payment and verifying information with that registered in the Road Traffic Register.


"The rebate will encourage more people to buy fuel-efficient cars and cars that run on green fuels. We have worked for a construction that is simple for the consumer and where the rebate will be paid in connection with the purchase. People should feel the environmental benefits with their heart, but also see them in their wallet," says Minister for the Environment Andreas Carlgren.


The Government will allocate SEK 50 million in 2007, SEK 100 million in 2008 and SEK 100 million in 2009 for the rebate. This will be presented in the coming Spring Fiscal Policy Bill.


Cars that will be covered by the rebate are those that meet the requirements for green cars and have been registered in the Swedish Road Traffic Register. The term 'green car' is explained in the definition formulated by the Swedish Road Administration and which currently applies for public procurement of cars. The definition does not promote a specific technology or a certain type of fuel. It aims at stimulating reduced use of fossil fuels and reduced carbon dioxide emissions.


"Sweden is a large country, extending over vast distances. We need cars, but car use must not be allowed to destroy the climate. Sweden has a large number of fuel-guzzling vehicles compared with other European countries. The quickest way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions is for petrol and diesel cars to use less fuel, at the same time as there is an increase in the number of cars using green fuels," says Mr Carlgren.


A green car is defined as follows:

  • Conventional cars: Petrol and diesel cars with carbon dioxide emissions that do not exceed 120 grams/km.
  • Alternative fuel cars: Cars that can run on fuels other than petrol or diesel and with fuel consumption that does not exceed 0.92 litre petrol/10 km, 0.84 litre diesel/10 km or 0.97 cubic metre gas/10 km.
  • Electric cars: A passenger car meeting environmental class Mk EL standards and with electric energy consumption that does not exceed 3.7 kilowatt hours/10 km.

Contact

Tomas Uddin