The fight against COVID-19 and its impact on democracy

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How is the fight against COVID-19 affecting global efforts to defend human rights and promote democracy?
As part of the Government’s Drive for Democracy, Sweden has launched a series of digital meetings to contribute to the global conversation on these issues.

Minister for Foreign Affairs Ann Linde in a video conference with Minister for International Development Cooperation Peter Eriksson, Annika Ben David, Michelle Bachelet, Eamon Gilmore, Christos Giakoumopoulos and Ingibjörg Sólrún Gísladóttir.
Minister for Foreign Affairs Ann Linde in a video conference with Minister for International Development Cooperation Peter Eriksson, Annika Ben David, Michelle Bachelet, Eamon Gilmore, Christos Giakoumopoulos and Ingibjörg Sólrún Gísladóttir. Christian Ugge/Regeringskansliet

Minister for Foreign Affairs Ann Linde and Minister for International Development Cooperation Peter Eriksson today took part in a digital meeting with representatives of four key intergovernmental organisations:

  • Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights
  • Eamon Gilmore, EU Special Representative for Human Rights
  • Christos Giakoumopoulos, Council of Europe Director General of Human Rights and Rule of Law
  • Ingibjörg Sólrún Gísladóttir, Director of the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights

The aim of the meeting was to contribute to the global conversation about the risk of the COVID-19 response leading to – or being used as a pretext for – undue restrictions on human rights, democracy and the rule of law. As a next step, meetings with national and international civil society organisations and other countries are planned. Sweden’s strong voice in defence of human rights, democracy and the rule of law is not silenced by a pandemic. The Drive for Democracy continues – but in different circumstances and different conditions.