Brexit – the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union

In a referendum held on 23 June 2016, a 52 per cent majority of voters in the UK voted to leave the European Union. On 29 March 2017, the UK applied to withdraw from the EU. The United Kingdom is expected to leave the European Union on 31 October 2019.

This page contains more information on the work of the Government and the Government Offices in response to the Brexit process, including preparations for a withdrawal. This includes a description of what a no-deal withdrawal would entail and what regulatory amendments have been implemented to deal with it, and what Brexit means for the business sector and the citizens who are particularly affected.

Responsible ministers
Stefan Löfven
Hans Dahlgren
Responsible ministries
Prime Minister's Office
Minister for EU Affairs Hans Dahlgren.
Minister for EU Affairs Hans Dahlgren. Photo: Ninni Andersson/Government Offices of Sweden

Current state of the Brexit process

The Government is assessing developments continuously and, in its communications with the people of Sweden and all actors in society, will provide all the information that can be provided. This page contains up-to-date information on the current situation.

Passengers at an airport. Photo: Lars Brundin/Sydsvenskan/TT
The withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union without an agreement would have consequences for private individuals in Sweden. For example, it would affect the rules concerning travel to and from the UK. Photo: Lars Brundin/Sydsvenskan/TT

What happens in the event of a no-deal withdrawal?

In view of the difficulties associated with the approval process on the UK side and the direction of the UK Government, there is an imminent risk of the United Kingdom leaving the EU without the Withdrawal Agreement being approved. If this takes place, it would do so according to the timetable that applies at midnight on 31 October.

Photo: Martina Huber/Government Offices of Sweden

What does Brexit mean for the citizens who are particularly affected?

This page contains information on what Brexit will mean for particularly affected citizens, namely Swedish and other European Union citizens living in the United Kingdom and UK citizens living in Sweden or another EU Member State.

Hans Dahlgren, Minister for EU Affairs and Stephen Barclay, Brexit Secretary.
Hans Dahlgren, Minister for EU Affairs and Stephen Barclay, Brexit Secretary. Photo: Andreas Enbuske/Regeringskansliet

What does Brexit mean for the business sector?

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union will affect companies that trade with the UK or are affected by UK participation in the single market in other ways. The business sector must follow the development of negotiations and prepare for all conceivable outcomes. In view of the difficulties associated with the approval process on the UK side and the direction of the UK Government, there is an imminent risk of a no-deal withdrawal.

Minister for Finance Magdalena Andersson and Minister for EU Affairs Hans Dahlgren in front of journalists
Minister for Finance Magdalena Andersson and Minister for EU Affairs Hans Dahlgren at a press conference about Sweden’s preparations ahead of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. Photo: Ninni Andersson/Government Offices of Sweden

Contingency planning to handle a no-deal

The Government, in cooperation with relevant agencies, is conducting contingency planning to address the serious consequences that would arise if the UK were to leave the EU without a withdrawal agreement. This concerns identifying, planning and carrying out the measures required to deal with the effects of such a scenario.

Photo: The Government Offices

Regulatory amendments to deal with Brexit

An important part of preparing for a no-deal withdrawal of the United Kingdom is implementing necessary regulatory amendments in both EU legislation and Swedish statutes.

Content about Brexit - the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union

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