Brexit – the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union

On 15 January, the House of Commons of the UK Parliament voted by a large majority to reject the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement. This means a setback in the process for an orderly UK withdrawal. It does not mean that the process has ended.

In a new vote on 29 January, the House of Commons gave its support to replace the backstop solution in the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland with alternative arrangements. It is therefore expected that Prime Minister May will soon raise this issue with the EU. According to the agreed timetable, the withdrawal agreement will be readdressed in the UK Parliament in mid-February.

The Swedish Government’s and the EU’s engagement to ensure an orderly withdrawal remains wholehearted, since a no-deal withdrawal is a particularly poor way to meet the challenges that a withdrawal would entail. It would also lay a very poor foundation for the future relationship between the EU and the UK.

However, the uncertainty of the situation means that the risk of a no-deal withdrawal remains clear. Efforts to prepare for such an outcome remain a necessary part of the work concerning Brexit.

Responsible ministers
Stefan Löfven
Hans Dahlgren
Responsible ministries
Prime Minister's Office
Photo: European Union 2017 Source: EC audiovisual service Photo: Mauro Bottaro

Preparations for UK withdrawal and contingency planning for a 'no-deal' scenario

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union will involve change and it is necessary for all concerned to prepare for this. The process of negotiation ended on 25 November when the European Council backed the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement and a political declaration on the future relationship. Approval processes are now under way in the UK parliament and in the European Parliament.

Photo: Martina Huber/Government Offices of Sweden

What does Brexit mean for the citizens who are particularly affected?

This page contains information on what Brexit will mean for particularly affected citizens, namely Swedish and other European Union citizens living in the United Kingdom and UK citizens living in Sweden or another EU Member State.

Photo: Ninni Andersson/Government Offices of Sweden

What does Brexit mean for businesses?

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union will affect companies that trade with the UK or are affected by UK participation in the single market in other ways. The business sector must follow the development of negotiations and prepare for all conceivable outcomes. The main scenario is an orderly withdrawal based on a withdrawal agreement that includes provisions on a transition period that runs until the end of 2020. However, a there is a clear risk for a no-deal withdrawal cannot be ruled out.

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  • Transitional solution for continued access to investment services following Brexit

    Today the Government will present a bill to the Riksdag to make it possible to exempt companies from the United Kingdom for a limited time from the requirement to hold a licence from Finansinspektionen (the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority) to provide investment services.

    Transitional solution for continued access to investment services following Brexit
  • Preparations for UK withdrawal and contingency planning for a 'no-deal' scenario

    The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union will involve change and it is necessary for all concerned to prepare for this. The process of negotiation ended on 25 November when the European Council backed the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement and a political declaration on the future relationship. Approval processes are now under way in the UK parliament and in the European Parliament.

    Preparations for UK withdrawal and contingency planning for a 'no-deal' scenario
  • What does Brexit mean for the citizens who are particularly affected?

    This page contains information on what Brexit will mean for particularly affected citizens, namely Swedish and other European Union citizens living in the United Kingdom and UK citizens living in Sweden or another EU Member State.

    What does Brexit mean for the citizens who are particularly affected?
  • Proposals aiming to offer EU citizens continued entitlement to social security benefits after Brexit

    In the social security area, the immediate effect of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU is that central EU legal provisions will no longer apply. To prevent any acute consequences, the Government is planning to take measures that will primarily mitigate the effects that may arise for individuals during the initial period after the withdrawal. The proposals aim to allow a period of adjustment.

    Proposals aiming to offer EU citizens continued entitlement to social security benefits after Brexit
  • What does Brexit mean for businesses?

    The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union will affect companies that trade with the UK or are affected by UK participation in the single market in other ways. The business sector must follow the development of negotiations and prepare for all conceivable outcomes. The main scenario is an orderly withdrawal based on a withdrawal agreement that includes provisions on a transition period that runs until the end of 2020. However, a there is a clear risk for a no-deal withdrawal cannot be ruled out.

    What does Brexit mean for businesses?
  • Setback in process for an orderly withdrawal

    On 15 January, the House of Commons of the UK Parliament voted by a large majority to reject the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement. This means a setback in the process for an orderly UK withdrawal. It does not mean that the process has ended.

    Setback in process for an orderly withdrawal