Current state of the Brexit process

Published

The Government is assessing developments continuously and, in its communications with the people of Sweden and all actors in society, will provide all the information that can be provided. This page contains up-to-date information on the current situation.

About the situation on 11 April

On 10 April, the European Council approved a second extension of the deadline for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

The deadline is now 31 October 2019 at the latest. This is a flexible deadline, so approval of the withdrawal agreement would mean that the UK leaves the EU on the first day of the subsequent month.

The UK is obliged to hold elections to the European Parliament if the withdrawal agreement is not approved by 22 May. If this does not happen, the UK will leave the EU on 1 June.  

The uncertainty surrounding the UK’s withdrawal endures, and the risk of withdrawal without an agreement is clear. Efforts to prepare for such an outcome are still a necessary part of the work concerning Brexit.

The engagement of the Swedish Government and the European Union for an orderly withdrawal remains wholehearted, since withdrawal without an agreement is a particularly poor way of addressing the challenges that withdrawal entails. It would also lay a very poor foundation for the future relationship between the EU and the UK. 

About the situation on 22 March

The European Council agreed on 21 March to extend the deadline for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU until 22 May 2019, on the condition that the withdrawal agreement with the EU is approved by the British Parliament.

If the withdrawal agreement is not approved during the week starting 25 March, the deadline will be extended until 12 April. The British Government is expected to return to the European Council by this date and describe a way forward, which will be considered by the European Council.

The uncertainty surrounding the UK’s withdrawal endures, and the risk of withdrawal without an agreement is clear. Efforts to prepare for such an outcome are still a necessary part of the work concerning Brexit.

The engagement of the Swedish Government and the European Union for an orderly withdrawal remains wholehearted, since withdrawal without an agreement is a particularly poor way of addressing the challenges that withdrawal entails. It would also lay a very poor foundation for the future relationship between the EU and the UK.

About the situation on 30 January

On 15 January, the House of Commons of the UK Parliament voted by a large majority to reject the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement. This means a setback in the process for an orderly UK withdrawal. It does not mean that the process has ended.

In a new vote on 29 January, the House of Commons gave its support to replace the backstop solution in the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland with alternative arrangements. It is therefore expected that Prime Minister May will soon raise this issue with the EU. According to the agreed timetable, the withdrawal agreement will be readdressed in the UK Parliament in mid-February.  

The Swedish Government’s and the EU’s engagement to ensure an orderly withdrawal remains wholehearted, since a no-deal withdrawal is a particularly poor way to meet the challenges that a withdrawal would entail. It would also lay a very poor foundation for the future relationship between the EU and the UK.

However, the uncertainty of the situation means that the risk of a no-deal withdrawal remains clear. Efforts to prepare for such an outcome remain a necessary part of the work concerning Brexit.

About the situation on 16 January

On 15 January, the House of Commons of the UK Parliament voted by a large majority to reject the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement. This means a setback in the process for an orderly UK withdrawal. It does not mean that the process has ended.

The Swedish Government’s and the EU’s engagement for an orderly withdrawal remains wholehearted, since a no-deal withdrawal is a particularly poor way to meet the challenges that a withdrawal would entail. It would also lay a very poor foundation for the future relationship between the EU and the UK.

However, the results of the vote make the risk of a no-deal withdrawal even clearer, and efforts to prepare for such an outcome will therefore remain a necessary part of work concerning Brexit.