The Swedish Government’s overall EU priorities 2018

By highlighting the most important issues in EU work for the fourth time in this electoral term, the Government is focusing its efforts where they are best needed, which enhances Sweden’s ability to influence developments. In 2018 the Government will give particular priority to questions concerning a social Europe for jobs and inclusive growth; an ambitious climate, energy and environment policy; a common asylum system and expanded cooperation on migration; and a secure EU in a secure world.

EU priorities 2018

  • A women and a man pointing on a digital board
    In 2018 the Government will give particular priority to questions concerning a social Europe for jobs and inclusive growth; an ambitious climate, energy and environment policy; a common asylum system and expanded cooperation on migration; and a secure EU in a secure world. Photo: Folio/Florian Küttler

    1. A social Europe for jobs and inclusive growth

    Even though the economic situation in the EU has improved, we see high long-term unemployment, growing gaps and unacceptably high youth unemployment in many parts of Europe. Well managed public finances at both national and EU level lays the foundation for greater confidence in the policy being pursued and stable economic growth shared by everyone.

  • Photo of houses
    Sweden is a leading actor in the design of a new regulatory framework for tougher requirements in the area of climate and energy. Photo: Ninni Andersson/Governemnt Offices

    2. An ambitious climate, energy and environmental policy

    The EU must continue to be a leader in climate action. Emissions of greenhouse gases must decrease and the share of renewable energy sources increase. The Paris Agreement of 2015 was a historic step, but now the EU and the rest of the world must implement the Agreement and show that the fight against climate change goes beyond words. Higher ambitions are needed to reach the Paris Agreement’s goal of keeping the global temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius and efforts need to be made to limit it to 1.5 degrees.

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    Sweden is one of the Member States that have contributed most in the area of migration. Photo: Ninni Andersson/Governemnt Offices

    3. A common asylum system and expanded cooperation on migration

    In 2016–2017 the EU took several important measures to handle the acute refugee situation and strengthen the present asylum system. Its common borders have been strengthened, work on return and resettlement has been intensified and the EU is continuing to combat ruthless human trafficking, as well as the root causes forcing people to flee. Refugee flows have decreased but many people are still risking their lives to come to Europe. Work for a sustainable, humane and functioning common migration and asylum policy therefore needs to continue.

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    An active neighbourhood policy is the best guarantee for democracy, welfare and stability in our neighbouring region. Photo: Astrakan/Folio

    4. A secure EU in a secure world

    As part of the EU’s global strategy for foreign and security policy its common policy is being developed to contribute to security both in and outside the EU. The European security order is still being challenged by Russia’s aggression against Ukraine. Important progress has been made to lay the foundation for inclusive and ambitiously structured defence cooperation (PESCO), and work is continuing to highlight this broad view of security.

  1. 1 A social Europe for jobs and inclusive growth
  2. 2 An ambitious climate, energy and environmental policy
  3. 3 A common asylum system and expanded cooperation on migration
  4. 4 A secure EU in a secure world