Several constructive decisions at UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn

Negotiations on the rules for implementing the Paris Agreement have been constructive, but have been marked by tough discussions, especially regarding how countries are to report their emissions. Countries have now submitted their views on the rules, and work is now continuing to ensure a decision on the rules can be taken next year.

Negotiations on the rules for implementing the Paris Agreement have been constructive, but have been marked by tough discussions, especially regarding how countries are to report their emissions. Countries have now submitted their views on the rules, and work is now continuing to ensure a decision on the rules can be taken next year.

Alongside negotiations on the rules, decisions have also been reached on several important issues. The Fijian Presidency put forward a proposal for the 'Talanoa Dialogue', which will be the first opportunity since Paris for countries to evaluate how global climate action corresponds to the 1.5 degree Celsius goal and how ambitions can be raised.

Sweden also announced that it is concluding its ratification of the Doha Amendment that establishes the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol.

"Sweden is now leading the EU in concluding its ratification of the Doha Amendment. We are pleased that the EU has also announced that it will conclude ratification before the end of the year," says Minister for International Development Cooperation Isabella Lövin.

The Doha Amendment means 20 per cent joint emission reductions compared to 1990 levels by 2020, when the first commitment period of the Paris Agreement begins.

"We are also providing an additional SEK 185 million each to the Adaptation Fund and Least Developed Countries Fund, which is an important signal to many developing countries that we are prepared to resolve the issue of financing climate action," says Ms Lövin.

At the conference, the UK and Canada launched the 'Powering Past Coal Alliance', a global coalition to phase out traditional coal power. Sweden and more than 20 other countries have already joined the alliance.

"Coal accounts for a large share of global emissions, and a rapid phase-out of coal power is essential to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. Sweden therefore wholeheartedly supports the alliance," says Ms Lövin.

A two-year gender action plan (GAP) for gender-responsive implementation of the Paris Agreement was also adopted at the conference. The GAP will ensure women's participation in negotiations and decision-making processes.

It is also gratifying that the 'action agenda', which gathers civil society actors, is larger than ever and has contributed positive momentum to the negotiations. The first Yearbook of Climate Action, capturing climate actions taken since 2016, was launched at the conference. The Yearbook shows that 70 per cent of the initiatives have launched new commitments since 2016 and that around half of these have set emissions reduction targets. The participation of civil society in reducing emissions will play a vital role in achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Contact

Anders Maxson
Press Secretary to Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate and Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lövin
Phone (switchboard) +46 8 405 10 00
Mobile +46 (0) 72 453 20 54
email to Anders Maxson