Youth policy

Youth policy is cross-sectoral and covers all decisions and measures that affect conditions for young people in a number of different areas, such as employment, housing, education, health, leisure, culture and influence.

Responsible for youth policy

Responsible minister

Jakob Forssmed
Jakob Forssmed Minister for Social Affairs and Public Health

Responsible ministry

News about youth policy

  • News feeds and publications

    The following list contains news items and published documents, such as press releases, government bills or proposals referred to the Council on Legislation for consideration. It is pre-filtered to display content tagged with the relevant area. The list can be further filtered to help you find what you are interested in.

Content about youth policy

Total 5 hits.

  • Fact sheet: Education for sustainable development

    The 2030 Agenda is a plan of action for universal and sustainable environmental, social and economic development. It is made up of 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Goal 4 emphasises quality education as a prerequisite for sustainable societies and lifestyles.

  • Barents: 25 years of successful cooperation

    The Barents cooperation has laid the foundation for far-reaching people-to-people cooperation and high-level political dialogue in the European Arctic. The 25th anniversary of cooperation was marked by a seminar at the Permanent Mission of Sweden to the European Union on 5 June to highlight cooperation in an EU perspective and to look ahead.

  • Swedish statement at the UN Security Council Open Debate on Youth, Peace and Security

    National statement delivered by Ambassador Irina Schoulgin-Nyoni on behalf of Sweden at the United Nations Security Council Open Debate on Youth, Peace and Security, 23 April 2018, New York.

  • Swedish Statement at the Security Council Open Debate on Youth, Peace and Security

    National statement delivered by Ambassador Irina Schoulgin-Nyoni on behalf of Sweden at the United Nations Security Council Open Debate on Youth, Peace and Security, 23 April 2018, New York.

  • Protecting children today prevents conflicts tomorrow

    In Yemen, one child dies every ten minutes because of extreme hunger and disease resulting from conflict. Close to 10 million children remain at risk; bearing the brunt of a crisis that they hold no responsibility for, or control over. In Syria, schools – where children should find safety – are regularly attacked; denying them both education and protection. Six million children in Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance. Millions more are seeking refuge in neighbouring countries and beyond. And, despite the fact that over 115,000 children have been released from armed groups since 2000, children continue to be recruited as soldiers and used in conflicts. Children are the most vulnerable and suffer most from conflict. How they are treated has consequences not only for their own future, but for that of their communities and countries. Sweden has a tradition of working to strengthen the protection of children in conflict, and we are using our membership of the Security Council to further advance this work.